Amazon Reviews (what they’re really worth)

Pretty sure I’ve experienced this as well!

K.E. Garvey

Last week was a busy one. I had a proofreading job and an editing job, both due by Friday. Then, I received an email from my domain provider on Tuesday, which set off a chain of events that robbed roughly 20 hours from my already packed week. After a multitude of phone calls to my domain provider, an attorney, and more than 250 screenshots of someone’s malicious activity… I had to scramble to finish my contracted work. I was so ready for the weekend!

My original intention was to write a post about internet trolls in general with Amazon Reviews being a small portion of it, but as it turns out, there was too much material for just one post.

So, today is about Amazon and how cyber trolls take advantage of their review system. There have been other blogs about the same subject and I hate to add to the already bloated web…

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Amazon Takes Aim At Scammers But Hits Authors

A look into one of the negative aspects of Kindle Unlimited. I recently read a book on KU that had this same clickbait in the front of the book. I had never seen it before, so I clicked but it was for nothing I wanted — a sort of “special offer”. It wasn’t until I clicked that I realized the whole point was an effort to ensure the author receives full payout for their book. Such drastic measures only seems to point to further issues with the KU system.

David Gaughran

kuAmazon is an extremely innovative company – and usually quite responsive to self-publisher’s concerns – but sometimes it gets things very wrong too.

Today is one of those times.

I’ve received several reports from writers threatened with having books removed from sale, and heard even more worrying stories from others who had their titles actually removed from the Kindle Store without notice.

What were these authors guilty of? What crime did they commit for Amazon to adopt such heavy handed treatment? Something completely innocuous: the Table of Contents was at the rear of their books instead of at the front.

Yep, that’s it.

We’ll get to what might be the root cause of this crackdown in a moment, but Amazon is claiming that having a TOC in the end-matter instead of the front-matter is a breach of the (ever-changing, 100+ pages) Kindle Publishing Guidelines (PDF). Amazon says that rear TOCs result in…

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